Opening This Week

Massimo Micheluzzi: Master of Venetian Glass – Ippodo Gallery

It may seem unusual for a Japanese art gallery to feature an Italian glass artist but in truth, the forms in Massimo Micheluzzi: Master of Venetian Glass (October 12 – November 19, 2021) can be considered classic, regardless of nationality. These 38 vases, covering a decade of work, feature either the murrine or battuto techniques of Murano glass artisans to great effect. In murrine, cross sections of colored, patterned glass are arranged on a plate, fused in the furnace to create a sheet, then blown into a vessel or even laid over an existing form and molded to that. The effect often looks painted, but careful examination reveals the color and shape is built into the object itself. Battuto (which means struck or beaten) is a carving technique done on cold glass, requiring a steady hand as well as an eye for balanced form. It works best with a single color of glass, creating unusual one-of-a-kind pieces that have a unique presence of their own. It’s easy to imagine a Micheluzzi vase in the tokonoma of a Japanese home, the foyer of a New York apartment, or the living room of a Venetian palazzo: each location is perfect, because each of his works has a universal appeal.

Ippodo Gallery, 32 East 67th Street, 3rd Floor, Hours: Tue – Fri: 10-6, Sat: 11-5, Admission: Free. Current NYC COVID requirements for indoor entertainment apply, click here for more information.


Lino Tagliapietra: JOURNEY – Heller Gallery

There are few living artists in the world who truly live up to their hype, and even fewer that achieve a near universal acclaim from professionals in the field and the public. As a matter of fact, we can only think of a handful – and one of them is Lino Tagliapietra. His decades of making glassworks, teaching, and training generations of artisans across the world in the Murano glass techniques, along with a deep love and respect for his medium, have made him a legend. In Lino Tagliapietra: JOURNEY (October 8 – November 6, 2021), visitors will see glass sculptures that are elegant, playful, and possess an astounding complexity of color and texture, creating new visions of beauty with every angle. Each piece is a masterclass in centuries of Italian glassmaking while being completely in tune with modern sensibilities, demonstrating why Tagliapietra’s imagination, craft, and experience are spoken of with awe by glass artisans everywhere.

Heller Gallery, 303 Tenth Avenue (between 27th and 28th Streets), Hours: Tue-Sat: 11 – 6, Admission: Free. Current NYC COVID requirements for indoor entertainment apply, click here for more information.


KALI – Staley-Wise Gallery

The latest show from Staley-Wise Gallery, KALI (September 30 – December 4, 2021), features the little-known photographer whose work in the 1960s-70s built on contemporary artistic theories that treated the print as an object separate from the image. Using various techniques to alter or enhance the image, Kali was able to create one of a kind layered effects of light, color, or shape, on both prints and Polaroids, referring to her work as ‘artography’ (although now the word has come to mean digitally manipulated photos with added design elements). The results are a complex progression of nuanced but fleeting impressions, like a window into another world.

Staley-Wise Gallery, 100 Crosby Street, Suite 305, Hours: Tue – Sat: 11-5, Admission: Free. Current NYC COVID requirements for indoor entertainment apply, click here for more information.


This Must Be the Place: Latin American Artists in New York, 1965-1975 – Americas Society

Exploring the history of Latin American & Caribbean artists of the sixties and seventies, This Must Be the Place: Latin American Artists in New York, 1965-1975 (September 22, 2021 – May 14, 2022), brings to life the creative energy and works of this diverse and complicated group. The exhibition features art, performance, and experimental work from over 40 artists and collectives such as Juan Downey, Hélio Oiticica, Regina Vater, Sylvia Palacios Whitman, Brigada Ramona Parra, Contrabienal, El Museo del Barrio, Taller Boricua, and Young Filmmakers Foundation, all exploring questions of identity, geography, politics, and more. In fact, there is so much material to explore in this lesser-known aspect of NYC’s 1960s-70s downtown scene, the gallery has divided the show in two sections: the first runs from September 22 – December 18, 2021, the second part from January 19 – May 14, 2022.

Americas Society, 680 Park Avenue at 68th Street, Hours: Wed – Fri: 12-5:30, Sat: 12-4:30, Admission: Free, however booking a visit is suggested, details are here. Current NYC COVID requirements for indoor entertainment apply, click here for more information.


Majolica Mania: Transatlantic Pottery in England and the United States, 1850-1915 – Bard Graduate Center Gallery

The Bard Graduate Center presents Majolica Mania: Transatlantic Pottery in England and the United States, 1850-1915 (September 24, 2021 – January 2, 2022), a carefully researched show outlining the history of majolica; a wildly exuberant and versatile pottery form that came to define the style of mid to late 19th century homes, especially in England and America. Through new techniques of glazing and firing, along with motifs reflecting the latest trends in popular culture, majolica’s innovative and fashionable designs were popular with middle- and upper-class consumers looking for distinctive ornamental homeware items. Although falling out of fashion by the early 1900s, the works still appeal to many, with modern artisans studying and creating pieces that take aesthetic inspiration from the movement.

Bard Graduate Center, 18 West 86th Street, Hours: Wed – Sun: 11-4, Admission: Adult: $15, Senior (aged 65 and older): $12, Student (K through 12, or with a college/university ID): $12. Please be advised that you must have a ticket purchased online to enter, the gallery will not accept walk-in visitors at this time. Timed entry tickets can be purchased here (and there is a service fee for all tickets). Current NYC COVID requirements for indoor entertainment apply, click here for more information.


In America: A Lexicon of Fashion – The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Using a different approach to their annual fashion exhibition, The Costume Institute of The Metropolitan Museum of Art presents In America: A Lexicon of Fashion (September 18, 2021 – September 5, 2022), an inclusive selection of clothing designs from the 1940s to the present, thematically arranged by intangible qualities of emotion and character. Displayed in individual cases, each outfit represents American fashion’s creativity, its reference points, and the importance of human connections.

Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue at 82nd Street, Hours: Sun – Tues and Thurs: 10-5, Fri – Sat: 10-9, Closed Wednesday. ONLINE RESERVATIONS FOR ENTRY (which is separate from admission fees) ARE MANDATORY FOR ALL VISITORS. Admission: Out of state visitors: Adults: $25, Seniors: $17, Students not from NY, NJ, or CT: $12, Children under 12 years: Free, Members: Free. These admission tickets are good for three consecutive days and permit entry to The Met Breuer, The Met, and The Met Cloisters.

Admission for NYS residents (must show proof, see website for details): Pay what you wish, Students from NY, NJ, CT (must show current student id): Pay what you wish. These admission tickets are good for same day only and permit entry to The Met Breuer, The Met, and The Met Cloisters.

Current NYC COVID requirements for indoor entertainment apply, click here for more information.


Philip Guston, Blackboard, 1969. Oil on canvas 201.9 x 284.5 cm / 79 1/2 x 112 in © The Estate of Philip Guston Courtesy the Estate and Hauser & Wirth Private Collection Photo: Genevieve Hanson

Philip Guston, 1969-1979 – Hauser and Wirth

Given the recent cancellation of a major exhibition on Philip Guston (due to sensitive issues in displaying certain images given the social justice protests of 2020, according to news publications), it’s encouraging that Hauser and Wirth are continuing their program of showing his works. In Philip Guston, 1969-1979 (September 9 – October 30, 2021), rarely seen canvases force viewers to think beyond the cartoonish, sometimes shocking content, towards larger questions of white culpability and US history. There are no answers from the artist, but his struggle to understand racial issues and human frailty is one that a modern audience can relate to.

Hauser and Wirth, 542 West 22nd Street, Hours: Tue – Sat: 10-5, Admission: Free. Current NYC COVID requirements for indoor entertainment apply, click here for more information.


Credit: Andy Warhol, Flowers (10 of 10 in Suite from Flowers Portfolio), 1970, Screenprint on paper, 28/250. From the Bank of America Collection. © 2021 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


Andy Warhol Portfolio: A Life in Pop Works from the Bank of America Collection – National Arts Club

Although it’s been 34 years since Andy Warhol died, his place in modern art and contemporary thought has never faded. As an artist, film director, producer, and magazine publisher, his promotional activities for himself (and others) have few parallels in the arts and media. As a result, it’s easy to lose sight of his uncanny ability to take simple forms and create a layered, nuanced series of images with color combinations that subtly influence how they’re perceived. In the traveling exhibit, Andy Warhol Portfolios: A Life in Pop Works from the Bank of America Collection (September 7 – November 4, 2021), visitors will have the chance to explore this skill in several of the artist’s prints series such as Endangered Animals, Grapes, Sunset, Myths, Space Fruit: Still Lifes, Sunset, and more, displayed in three galleries at the National Arts Club.

National Arts Club, 15 Gramercy Park South (20th Street between Park Avenue South and Irving Place), Hours: Mon – Fri: 10-5, Admission: Free. Current NYC COVID requirements for indoor entertainment apply, click here for more information.


The Push Pin Legacy and You Won’t Bleed Me: How Blaxploitation Posters Defined Cool & Delivered Profits – Poster House

For the fall 2021 season, Poster House presents five exhibits that tap into the paradigm-busting, zeitgeist-setting design of American graphic arts from the 1960s to the 2000s. The Push Pin Legacy (September 2, 2021 – February 6, 2022), a survey of the illustrious company that created images for everything from the arts to political protests, You Won’t Bleed Me: How Blaxploitation Posters Defined Cool & Delivered Profits (September 2, 2021 – February 6, 2022), a singular collection of powerful images that defined a film genre unlike anything America had seen before, Vera List & The Posters of Lincoln Center (September 2 – October 3, 2021), a master class on creating an identity for an arts brand defined by location as much as content, What’s the Score? The Posters of LeRoy Neiman (September 2, 2021 – March 27, 2022), has strong visuals conveying the energy and ambition of athletes, Peter Max: Cosmic Advertising (October 14, 2021 – March 27, 2021), that defined the 60s through color and form – all demonstrate why this museum’s shows are a must-see, season after season.

Poster House, 119 West 23rd Street (between 6th and 7th Avenues), Hours: Thur – Sun: 10-6, Admission: Adults: $12, Students: $8, Educators: $8, People 60 years of age and older (w/ proof of age): $8, Visitors with a disability: $8 (along with free admission for one accompanying care-partner), Children aged 18 years and under: Free Admission, Members: Free Admission. Current NYC COVID requirements for indoor entertainment apply, click here for more information.